Flexibility: Medium

Social Engagement: High

What’s What: Every kid at every school deserves some TLC on one of those “not so good very bad days.” If you have some training, you could be the School Nurse who makes things better.

Amava Take: Sniffles, coughs, spread-like-wildfire stomach bugs, phone calls to parents and some record keeping; that’s what School Nurses do. If you’d like to give some care, a bit of triage and work in an educational setting instead of a strictly medical one, being a School Nurse could be just the right prescription.

From the Front Lines:

What kinds of candidates are you looking for to fill these positions?

Qualified, compassionate and calm. Simple as that.

Any tips for first-timers to make it a productive and fulfilling experience?

In this setting, you’re not surrounded by people who speak in medical jargon. But maybe that’s a good thing?

What’s a typical daily schedule like?

Some schools only have nurses on duty for part of the day or a few days a week. It all depends on what the school budget covers.

From the Trenches:  

What’s the most satisfying part of the job/experience?

Making “owies” better of course!

How would you describe the hard parts?

When an emergency happens it is always stressful.

Do you like working as a nurse in a school setting?

Yes, it’s more relaxed. I don’t feel like I have to rush and I can really pay attention to each patient.

Special Requirements: You’ll need an undergraduate degree in nursing or a related field as well as as  a School Nurse Service Credential and state licensing. Some employers have other specific requirements. Here’s an overview of what a School Nurse does.

Finding a Position: Many public schools have cut full-time school nursing positions due to budget constraints, but there are many part-time positions and a push to find more government funding support for this crucial role. In addition to local jobs on education sites, The National Association of School Nurses has job listings to get you connected with positions near you.