Flexibility: Medium

Social Engagement: High

What’s What: Even in this virtual world, every business needs a front-office person. Increasingly, these opportunities are flexible and part-time.

Amava Take: Most of us run our own phones and computers these days, so the kinds of skills you need to be a receptionist are those you probably already have! You know, keeping calendars, handling the phone and email flow, greeting people who come into the office. Sometimes receptionists do data entry as well if there’s downtime, but you wouldn’t be reading this if you lacked those basic tech skills, now would you? The cool part of a flexible job like this is you’re part of something dynamic and get to meet and interact with interesting people. Why not get after that?

From the Front Lines:

What kinds of candidates are you looking for to fill these jobs?

Friendly, efficient people do so well in this role!

Any tips for first-timers to make it a productive and fulfilling experience?

Every entity has its own personality—be open to representing it.

What’s a typical daily schedule like?

Not too many surprises here—your shifts are pretty regular and are agreed upon in advance.

From the Trenches:

What’s the most satisfying part of the job?

It’s fun to be the voice of a company!

How would you describe the hard parts?

Sitting isn’t my favorite, so I sometimes work standing up!

What’s the coolest thing you learned on-the-job that you can share?

Nobody is too busy for a smile and some human connection.

Special Requirements: More than anything, being positive and resourceful. Most companies prefer at least a high school degree and some basic computer skills. If you’re looking in a specific industry, some basic command of the lingo will get you pretty far. Here’s an overview of receptionist skills and job description.

Finding a Position: Search “receptionist jobs near me” and see what comes up. You can try sites that list hourly jobs or look for receptionist jobs on specialized sites.