Flexibility: High

Social Engagement: Medium (online)/High (in person)

What’s What: Are you a former professional with some kind of advisory or management experience? Coaches for transitions and goal-setting are much-needed in this growing industry and you might have what it takes to be great!

Amava Take: There are plenty of financial professionals giving advice about job changes and retirement. But, being a life coach or a retirement coach takes a very different skill set. People need guidance to set and reach their goals beyond the financial to be fulfilled. If you’ve been out in the world managing or advising people already, this could be the flexible job for you. Not all coaches wear sweats and a whistle!

From the Front Lines:

What kinds of candidates are you looking for to fill these jobs?

A person with inspiring lessons to share who loves to help people reach their goals.

Any tips for first-timers to make it a productive and fulfilling experience?

Defining goals as sharply as possible at the outset is important.

What’s a typical daily schedule like?

Hourly sessions are typical, but frequency can vary.

From the Trenches:

What’s the most satisfying part of the job?

Giving practical and actionable advice to a motivated individual.

How would you describe the hard parts?

Goal-setting can be a journey.

Do you take your own advice?

Unequivocally.

Special Requirements: This is a flexible job that you mostly learn by doing. There are a smattering of certification organizations out there, but not any that are singularly authoritative, so choose what is a good fit for you if you decide you want to get certified.

Finding a Position: You can join up with a company or non-profit that trains and supports a team of coaches, or you can go it alone using mostly word-of-mouth and perhaps some advertising. To become a retirement coach specifically, seek out an organization tailored to retirement coaching.