Flexibility: Medium

Social Engagement: High

What’s What: If you’re a fix-it type and you know your way around the nuts and bolts of a project, you could be a valuable addition to the staff at a hardware store near you.

Amava Take: Not all retail jobs are the same. When people go to the hardware store, they expect some real help getting the right tools for the job they are undertaking. That’s where your encyclopedic knowledge of those twisty things you hang stuff with, shims, drills, cords, braces and such can really come in handy. If you’re a bit of a tool-nerd, this flexible job could really hit the nail on the head. 

From the Front Lines: 

What kinds of candidates are you looking for to fill these positions? 

People with knowledge, good hands and do-it-yourself or construction experience are fantastic for these jobs.

Any tips for first-timers to make it a productive and fulfilling experience?

It is well worth it to ask for a store map and study up on where things are before your first shift.

What’s a typical daily schedule like?

Generally, it is shift work.

From the Trenches:  

What’s the most satisfying part of the job/experience?

It is so great when someone comes in with a puzzle for me and I can brainstorm with the customer about the best way to get the job done.

How would you describe the hard parts?

When we don’t stock that one thing someone needs.

What surprised you the most about the experience?

How social this job is! I talk to people all day and I really enjoy that.

Special Requirements: Knowledge and experience help a lot, and most employers require a high school diploma. Sales experience is also a plus, but being friendly and helpful go a long way. 

Finding a Position: National hardware chains have zip-code searchable databases. Sites that specialize in part-time and hourly jobs also have many listings for hardware store jobs.