Flexibility: Medium

Social Engagement: High

What’s What: Community Gardens are popping up like, well, daisies—all over the place. They’re in small towns, big cities, schools and universities and even on private property. People have figured out that working together while you work the land has many benefits, from social to nutritional. Whether you want to invite others to your homestead or you want to take a leading role someplace else, coordinating a community garden can be rewarding flexible work.

Amava Take: Collective gardening builds community, conserves land, feeds people and beautifies places. Individual or shared plots on private or public land yield fruit, vegetables, and pretty plants while bringing people together in a productive social environment. If you have the right property, you can run a communal garden on your own land, or you can apply to be a coordinator for a community garden near you.

From the Front Lines:

What kinds of candidates are you looking for to fill these positions?

Green thumb, warm heart, organized brain!

Any tips for first-timers to make it a productive and fulfilling experience?

Hold people accountable for whatever they commit to doing.

What’s a typical daily schedule like?

Plant, water, weed, harvest! It depends on the season, but the participants have to be kept organized.

From the Trenches:  

What’s the most satisfying part of the job/experience?

The beauty and the bounty!

How would you describe the hard parts?

It’s always a bummer when a garden pest makes things hard on our garden.

What surprised you the most about the experience?

The intergenerational excitement that growing things creates!

Special Requirements: To learn more about starting your own community garden, check this out. For information and resources, check out this community garden organization.

Finding a Position: If you want to start a community garden on your property, sharing platforms can help. National job portals list jobs as do local ones, such as this one in New York City. If you search “community garden coordinator,” on the internet you’ll find local listings as well.