Usually, when we mark our editorial calendar to write about the longest day of the year, we plan to publish it as close to the summer solstice as possible. Because, after all, the literal definition of the summer solstice is that the sun hits its highest position in the sky, producing the longest period of daylight. In the Northern Hemisphere, that happens in June and it conjures images of picnics, beach days and after-dinner walks. Not that there’s anything wrong with those! 

 


 

What’s Up With Time?

The reality of pandemic life has put a new spin on time. The long and the short of it is, things are feeling, well, simultaneously long and short. A month seems like a year, but a week goes by in the blink of an eye (is it really Friday again?). You sit down at your desk and start typing and before you know it, it’s dinner time. What is going on?

It turns out, quite a lot. The time experts have weighed in and it seems this all has something to do with the fact that without the typical objective markers (things like commutes, traffic and meals out) that signal to us that it is time for us to do a particular thing, we have trouble calibrating the passage of time. It’s confusing.

 

Time Can Work For You.

But it’s also an opportunity to ask ourselves some revealing questions. Things like, do I like puttering, do I enjoy gardening, do I miss traveling, are there new ways for me to connect with my community? There is time to consider what togetherness and connection really mean and permission to pursue things that interest us in a deeper way. Maybe our need to measure things in terms of long and short is causing a paradox because we’re applying preconceived measurements to a new reality. Perhaps the new normal that everyone is touting is about more than how many people will be allowed in a restaurant at one time. It may be that quality and depth replace the more traditional metrics of short, long and how much. We’ve done the research and we believe the key is connection. That’s the long and the short of it. And the width, depth and quality as well.