Today our friends keep you woke to the “new slang.” And for good measure, Boo asks Millie why she snickers every time Boo uses her iPhone.

 


 

ON ABBREVIATIONS AND SLANG

Boo: I’m trying to stay relevant. Name some text-language abbreviations that you think I won’t know!

Millie: Alright, in no particular order: TBH, IKR, OTP, IDK, IDC!

Boo: Ha! To be honest (I know, right?), I don’t know and I don’t care what OTP means!

Millie: Nice. Ok, that wasn’t too bad. Maybe OTP wasn’t fair. “OTP” stands for one true pairing. Often the idea of “shipping” and “OTP” go together. People can express their love or obsession for a certain celebrity relationship or TV relationship by “shipping,” short for relationship–meaning wishing for a couple to be together. Then, that great couple is OTP!

Boo: Wish I could unhear that. Do we have time for a pet peeve on this topic?

Millie: Sure thing.

Boo: I’m fine with all the abbreviations, but I think it’s odd/funny when they become so much part of the parlance that they get pronounced. For example, when I hear “LiMAYO” or “Li–MOW” said out loud to mean LMAO, which is an acronym (for “laugh my BUTT off”), I think we’ve got a lot of layers going on there.

Millie: Wanna go again?

Boo: Try me.

Millie: On fleek, bye Felicia, salty and FOMO. Go for it.

Boo: Ok, ok. Because I have some Fear Of Missing Out, I try my best to stay on fleek with my slang.

Millie: So far so good, though usually on fleek describes something more physical–like an outfit or someone’s eyebrows. Bonus! On point is sometimes used as a synonym.

Boo: Wait, so you’re saying I used on fleek wrong? How can I use a made up thing wrong? Fleek isn’t an actual word!

Millie: Don’t get salty! I’m trying to teach you!

Boo: Ugh, enough. Bye, Felicia!

Millie: I’ll bet you don’t know why people say that do you?

Boo: Nope. And I don’t want to. But I saw it on a reality show.

 

ON THE TECH MISTAKES OF OUR ELDERS

Boo: Why do my kids always make fun of the way I use technology? You guys are so harsh on us! What’s so wrong with how we use our phones?

Millie: You know, I think it’s really about the photos. I mean using all that punctuation when you text is an issue too, but my goodness, what is so hard about taking a proper selfie? Why can’t you bend your arms naturally, keep your fingers away from the actual lens and avoid those bad angles? It’s not that tough! And one good one is enough! You don’t need ten!

Boo: Sheesh.

Millie: Honestly, there’s more. The humble bragging when you post? The putting up the worst picture of your kids that you can find? The chatting with their friends online because you’re just that cool?

Boo: Hey, I’ve learned to reign it in and I check with my kids before I post anything now and I spend less time on social media in general. I’m also a lot more mindful of giving up control of personal information than I was when all of this was new. Baby steps!

 

At Amava, we believe that age does not define us. We favor actual interactions and honest relationships over clichés like the one about Millennials and Baby Boomers being at odds, at cultural loggerheads or at war. In real life, Millie & Boo are at the café enjoying one another’s company. The Millennial and Boomer (get it?) are two friends having conversations about things that matter—work, social issues, money, relationships, travel and more. They were nice enough to write some of it down for us so you can be entertained and perhaps enlightened by their sharing and comparing. We hope it inspires you to start conversations of your own.